Building Relationships and Breaking Down Silos with Will Moeller.

Building Relationships and Breaking Down Silos with Will Moeller

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Today on the Salesforce Admins Podcast, we talk to Will Moeller, Salesforce Administrator. Join us as we chat about why relationships are the key to building trust and engaging with stakeholders and end users alike.

You should subscribe for the full episode, but here are a few takeaways from our conversation with Will Moeller.

Lessons from a clinical social worker

Will is my first guest with a degree in clinical social work, and I wanted to bring him on the pod to talk about how those skills have translated into his role as a Salesforce Admin. He first started working with databases and data via the Homeless Management Information System (HMIS).

When Will’s nonprofit got a significant grant, they decided to move their data into Salesforce. He quickly became a self-described fanboy. His career has taken him to other places, but there are some key lessons he’s learned from social work that can help you connect with stakeholders and end users alike.

Finding congruence

We focus a lot on the business problems we’re trying to solve and the technical solutions we’re going to implement. Will, however, urges you to attend to the relationships you’re building in your meetings with users and stakeholders.

A key part of building relationships is knowing your audience. High-level stakeholders are going to go into a meeting with very different goals and concerns than an end user will have. Will explains the concept of “congruence,” a term from clinical social work. It means taking the time, before a meeting with someone, to understand their perspective and how you need to frame things to get them to listen to you.

Navigating diverse audience priorities

Different audiences are going to have different priorities. In a meeting with stakeholders, you need to frame things in terms of the bottom line. Convincing your boss to address technical debt will go a lot more smoothly if you frame it in terms of how it’ll save your business time and money as time goes on.

For end users, Will finds it helpful to focus on building trust. As he says, they’re going to come into a meeting with you thinking, “This is my job, I need to trust that you’re going to have my best interest at the front of your mind as you’re going through this.”

As Will says, the key here is taking time to understand the motivations of the people you’re meeting with before you sit down together. This episode is full of other great tips for managing your business relationships, so be sure to take a listen.

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Full show transcript

Mike:
This week on the Salesforce Admins Podcast, we’re talking with Will Moeller about building trust and engaging with stakeholders. It’s the softer side of being a Salesforce admin, so a little less clicking this time. Will is a passionate Salesforce admin with a master’s degree in social work, so he’s really got a lot of cool concepts and a mean acronym that he’s going to share with us.
But before we get into that, I want to be sure you’re doing one thing, which is following the Salesforce Admins Podcast on Spotify or iTunes or wherever you get your podcasts. I’m telling you that because then, that way, every Thursday a new episode will just magically appear on your phone. You don’t have to worry about it. You grab your phone, go on your commute, walk your dog, grab a cup of coffee or tea, and you’re all set. It’s downloaded, and you’re ready to go and start learning. You could do that if you followed us. Anyway, let’s assume you did, because you downloaded this episode, and let’s get to our conversation with Will.
Will, welcome to the podcast.

Will Moeller:
Thanks for having me, Mike.

Mike:
Yeah, let’s get started off. Tell everybody a little bit about how you found Salesforce and what you’re doing now.

Will Moeller:
Sure. My journey with Salesforce started a few years back. Actually, if we go back even further, databases and working with data has just been a part of my career since, really, I finished graduate school. For those who work in the homeless industry, they’ll know what HMIS is, which is the Homeless Management Information System. It’s a data standard produced by HUD to make sure that congressional reporting is accurate, and so they mandate all the homeless agencies use the same dataset.
I started working the HMIS standards for the county I worked in. Then the not-for-profit I had worked for got a significant grant, and we decided that we were going to move our data system from the free platform, that was HMIS, to Salesforce. In that project, an implementation project, I saw the power of the platform and pretty quickly became a huge Salesforce fanboy and was proclaiming all the cool things you could do working in a charity and seeing what power it had.
The pandemic hit, and a number of changes occurred. I really did some self-reflection and said, “You know what? I think it’s time to pivot a little bit,” as many people were doing during the pandemic. I hung up my credentials as a clinical social worker and started my journey as a Salesforce admin. Fast-forward about a year and a half, two years, and now I work for a major international brand as one of their Salesforce admins.

Mike:
Wow. We’ve had a lot of guests on the pod with varying degrees of background, from retail to tank commanders, all kinds. I don’t think we’ve ever had anybody on with a master’s degree in social work. Tell me how a master’s degree in social work is helping you be a successful admin.

Will Moeller:
Yeah, it’s a great question, and it comes up all the time. One of the things that you learn when you go into a helping profession, very quickly, is to listen. Starting my career in the charity space, the charity I worked for is pretty unique in the sense that a lot of the people who were doing the work were in their second careers. They were often old enough to be my parents, and it was very interesting to talk to them about their careers.
There’s one that stands out. It is actually the founder of the charity I worked for, another fellow Iowa person. He said very plainly one day that sales is relationships. I’ve been reflecting on that for 15-20 years now, and I see it everywhere.
You recently had a podcast with Cheryl Feldman, where she said, “Tell me what you do.” I was recently in one of the MVP Office Hour meetings and heard Dale Ziegler say something about a golden circle on talking about why, how, what, which are all really key parts of what I learned in the helping profession, that you need to be asking or using those kinds of words. I also find that those pieces are missing something. That’s where the cofounder of the charity I worked for really hit the nail on the head and kind of hammered it in of relationships.

Mike:
Yeah, I never really… I mean, a lot of what we do at Salesforce and a lot of content we put out is always the what, like how do you do things? Jennifer Lee’s great with her Automate.

Will Moeller:
Yes.

Mike:
This series on building flows and what you’re doing, but I think what’s interesting about this is we forget that a good 50% of the Salesforce admin job is really relationship, and it’s relationship, not only with our users because we need them to consume and be successful, which is our goal, but also relationship with our stakeholders. I guess, as somebody that works with a lot of stakeholders and has that background in relationship building, where do you start?

Will Moeller:
That’s a challenging question to answer in the sense of who are you with at that moment? Because there are a number of ways to approach that, and I reflect on the three different companies and the different roles I’ve been in, in my Salesforce journey. Let’s just start at the high level, right?
As a builder, a Salesforce admin, a developer, architect even, if you’re in a meeting with the top leaders, the executive leadership or the product owners of your Salesforce implementation, what they’re going to be thinking about and what their goals are, are going to be different than, say, if you’re doing a user story session, where you’re trying to get the user stories out of the end-user. Your approach is going to vary, based upon who you’re in front of, but at the end of the day, what is the foundation you need to start on, Mike? You need to start on a foundation of having a relationship.
Let me turn it a little bit here and say, when you reflect on your career a little bit, how have you approached some of those sessions where I think it might be the most challenging for some of the admins in the community of you’re now sitting in front of a VP or an executive vice president, and this is the first meeting you’ve had with them. How do you start that, right?
Salesforce has given you a lot of the tools, whether it’s building a process map or a persona, but in your experience, Mike, if you’re in front of a VP or an EVP, are they going to want to do a persona or a process map with you?

Mike:
Probably not. They don’t have time.

Will Moeller:
No. No, they don’t have time. Okay, now as an admin, you’ve lost many of your tools, so now what do you need to dig through to get?

Mike:
With the executive?

Will Moeller:
Yeah, yeah.

Mike:
I mean, you… The biggest thing I always feel like, and this goes to what you’re talking about, is it depends on my relationship with that executive. You said, I think, a keyword. You said it was the first time I’ve sat down. I also need to know, does the executive or the stakeholder I’m working with have any history of me, right?

Will Moeller:
Uh-huh.

Mike:
Because I’ve had that in organizations where I exist in the organization and I’m talked about at the executive level before I even have that meeting to demo Salesforce or show a dashboard or something, and so, in that, the reputation is there, and then I just need to follow that up with knowledge.
But absent of that, if it’s fresh, which generally would happen with like when I’m going over to meet with an IT organization, they don’t know me, right? This is common at big companies, too, where there’s… How many people work there? And you can’t know everybody, and so you sit down, and you kind of have to establish yourself as like, no, I know what I’m talking about. I’m the expert here, and I’m not just a chauffeur, I think.

Will Moeller:
Right. The term from my clinical and social work background that I’m going to pull out is congruence. You need to come into that meeting being congruent, aligned with that group. You hit a couple of things that I want to pull out, which is the idea that they’re too busy.
All of us are skilled at building relationships in different ways. We all have methods that we have developed over the course of our lifetime, but being in one of those meetings with the top leaders who are busy and may have other priorities than spending an hour with the Salesforce admin or developer, you need to put yourself in a place of congruence with them. It might mean, before you go into that meeting, just like you had said, they’ve probably talked about you, heard some things about you, learned your reputation, you need to come in understanding how that person operates and how they interact in meetings, so that you can be congruent with them.
Let me take that a level deeper. In the helping field, they often talk about getting in the same speech, whether it’s word choice, speed of language, even intonation in your voice. Those kinds of things make a significant difference. If you talk about these in this hypothetical executive meeting, they’re not going to care. You just need to do that. That’s the way you need to be, because it makes them feel more comfortable.
Let’s go back to drawing out some of your experience. Can you think of some times where things have… Let’s go with you’ve just hit it out of the park because, for whatever reason, you speak a language that they speak, and I don’t mean like English or Spanish. I mean like you understand cars deeply, and you can speak car.

Mike:
Yeah, I think some of what you bring up is also the ability to tailor your method of presenting in a way that is most conducive to them receiving it, right? I’ve had to do that before with executives. You walk in, like okay, here’s how this meeting’s going to go. You kind of get the brief from somebody else or a stakeholder on what they like to do.
I’ve had sales managers before that you could set their clock 10 minutes. The first 10 minutes of every meeting was just chitchat. They had to do chitchat. It was an hour-long meeting, first 10 minutes just chitchat. Everybody gets talking. Then, literally, the hand will like tink right to the 10-minute mark, and they’ll start the meeting, right?
Other people… Nope, let’s get down to business. Let’s talk through this. Let’s see if we can’t get through the meeting faster than what it’s scheduled.

Will Moeller:
Yep. You know, what’s really interesting with what you just called out is you said sales leader or sales director.

Mike:
Well, they were at the time.

Will Moeller:
Yeah, and that immediately hearkened me back to the founder of the charity I started working for. He said, “Sales is relationships.” He was masterful at building that rapport quickly. There were a couple other people that worked there that were salespeople, and you can see they do this, we’ll call it a dance, at the beginning of conversations.
When I had first started my career, I was very much a… Well, give me a technique. Tell me how to do it. Give me a tool. Let me get in there and get it done. But I’ve learned over the years that, depending on the person you’re with, you may need that 10 minutes, but you may actually put yourself in a bad place by starting with those 10 minutes, so that’s where you have to know your audience to really go into that meeting, and that’s especially for the executive meeting. If you turn it to the end-user, what’s their motivation? Sitting down with the Salesforce admin, what are they thinking?

Mike:
Yeah, and also, I always thought of it as what’s their level of dependence on the platform, right?

Will Moeller:
Mm-hmm.

Mike:
Because I’ve had some, where it’s very transactional; it’s one of two or three screens that they have to input data into. I’ve had others, where it was literally like this determines their workday, the queue or list view, because of the process, and also being able to tailor, knowing, going from department to department, kind of, okay, switching gears, here’s how I need to present the exact same material to somebody else, right? How often haven’t you been asked, at any of the organizations you’ve been with, “Can you show us a demo of Salesforce?”

Will Moeller:
Mm-hmm.

Mike:
Right? It’s inevitably, and I’ve done this before, and I made the mistake, I would demo what another department’s doing.

Will Moeller:
Yep.

Mike:
Which never works, because that other department is rarely plugged in, rarely understands their process, and doesn’t get why they would do those things, and then can’t contextualize why you’re seeing those things. I think it’s… I always realized this later, but cooking shows now do a really good job of this. Cooking shows 20 years ago used to just be how you put things together and how the recipe turned out. Now, I mean, some of these cooking shows are it’s all competition, I think, but in that, you also learn that, in order to make something… I’ll use this for example. In order to make something sweet, you don’t always have to grab sugar. You can grab honey. You can grab other ingredients that would substitute the same.
After I realized that, when I would be asked to “go demo Salesforce,” you don’t just go to the store and be like, okay, we’re making cookies, and grab sugar. You’re like, wait a minute. This department, they can’t eat sugar, so maybe I’m going to go grab honey or applesauce as a substitute. You do the same when you’re doing the demo, like okay, so I’m going to show you how the sales team uses Salesforce, but in this case, for an opportunity, like if I was showing the research department, you could think of this as a research project. Then you almost know, and maybe you know the psychology behind this, but you can see it, because people’s shoulders kind of drop, and they lean back in their chair a little bit. That was always, to me, the physical cue that I’m like, okay, I got them.

Will Moeller:
Yeah, and I think a part of what that is, is it’s the concern, the protection that people come into a lot of those meetings with, especially the end-user group, of this is my job. You are coming to do something to it. I need to trust. There it is again. I need to trust that you’re going to have my best interest at the front of your mind as you’re going through this.
I think a part of what we, as admins, have to be thinking about is, going to your demo example, I often, especially working for this big company now, I work with three different areas of the business, and I’m not talking department. I’m talking about subsidiaries, entirely different businesses, but they all do the same thing. When they ask for a demo, the first thing I ask myself is do I have a good enough understanding of what their business process is, before I even do a demo?

Mike:
Right.

Will Moeller:
There’s a lot of reasons behind that, but I want to make sure that I understand my audience. I want to make sure I understand their motivation. If I remember correctly, that’s one of the pieces of getting a good user story is not the mechanical I need to do A plus B, so I can get C. It’s why? The motivation behind that, that is such a critical part, because when you’re doing those demos, where they can go a little challenging is… Using your cooking example, you’re backing cookies, and you get the jar of sugar out or the bag of sugar out, and you have somebody who can’t have sugar. Their anxiety is immediately going to jump up when they see that sugar come out of the cabinet. It is where, if you already know that they can’t have that, you already grab the different ingredient, so immediately they don’t go into that protection type stance.

Mike:
Right.

Will Moeller:
You have to have that foundation of relationship, and it can be built in so many different ways, right? In the executive example, you may have to do some pre-research, because you’re not going to have the exposure to that person to know how they operate in meetings, so you may need to get secondary sources to give you info on how to run that meeting or how to be in that meeting.
If you know that sales leader loves the first 10 minutes, awesome. Just lean into that 10 minutes and really get to know them and really build that rapport, build that trust, because then, when you have that relationship foundation, when you start throwing ideas out that might be threatening, or perceived as threatening, you then have that social capital that you can draw on to navigate the concern that may come up. That’s where you really start winning, because you can align your goals with their goals and the goals you might have for the platform.
Let me give you an example, one that I’m working on, on a daily basis right now. Everybody’s favorite term, technical debt.

Mike:
Oh, boy.

Will Moeller:
Right? I came into my current employer very enthusiastic, and I still am enthusiastic about the platform and what it can do. The platform, for them, is 10 years old, and there are business processes that have been running for that full 10 years. The inevitable question becomes, “Well, what’s my return on technical debt? Why should I spend time and invest effort into getting rid of something that doesn’t do anything for me?”
It took some time and listening to understand what their goals are, and it’s not just there’s. It’s my boss. It’s the enterprise’s goals. It’s each of the subsidiaries, and reconciling all of those disparate ideas into a shared vision, which, at the end of the day, in a for-profit industry, it’s to make more money. We want to increase revenue.
In order to get technical debt paid, which I really, desperately wanted to get rid of, because it was just plugging up the organ, making things more complex to deal with, I had to tie it back to revenue. So, thanks to Salesforce, for three releases a year and new features coming out all the time, I can paint a vision for using Data Cloud or using many of the Einstein functions, and I can weave those more advanced features with where we are today, what their goals are, individually or as an enterprise, into a shared vision. That’s how you start winning the things that you want to win and making progress, both in your career but also in your experience and also for the enterprise or the place that you work.
Let me turn it to a different example. You actually have talked about cooking a couple of times. Do you have any experience doing cooking with a loved one?

Mike:
All the time.

Will Moeller:
All the time. You can probably think back on times where those cooking experiences didn’t go smooth, or when they were just as smooth as warm butter, where everything is firing on the same page and everybody knows exactly what’s going on. In my mind, it goes back to some of these core trust and relationship features here, right? When you think of one of those cooking experiences that went really smooth, were your goals aligned?

Mike:
Yeah. I mean, I would say not only just the goals, but also the communication was there, right? We knew where we were going, but we also knew how we were getting there.

Will Moeller:
Yes. Yes.

Mike:
That, to me, is always the… That’s usually the part where, it’s not like I make difficult dishes. We live in the Midwest. Everything’s a casserole, you know?

Will Moeller:
Which is easier.

Mike:
Right, and I don’t bake, because people smarter than me bake, because I don’t get the measurements right, ever.

Will Moeller:
Don’t substitute. I learned that the hard way with my wife a couple of times.

Mike:
Yeah, even… I mean, that’s why I like cooking, because if you cook and you’re like I just need it hotter, you just dump in whatever hot sauce you’ve got in the house, but if you’re baking and it’s… Yeah, I’ve learned my lesson but, yeah, I mean it’s, especially it’s around the holidays. You try to time dishes out, so that your mashed potatoes and your pie are done at the same time.
The goal, you know, is always dinner. It’s how are we getting there? And what are you doing? That communication part, that’s when stuff kind of breaks down. It’s not… I don’t know if you’ve ever seen the show The Bear. They did a holiday episode. It’s never been that bad at my house, thankfully, but there’s always somebody that’s trying to head in the same direction.

Will Moeller:
Well, let me try and turn this to a little bit more tactical. This is harking back to my early years when conversations would get into the more theoretical, the soft, touchy kind of space, I would get a little frustrated, because I’d want the tactical. Tell me how to do it, right?

Mike:
Mm-hmm.

Will Moeller:
There’s a bunch of tools I picked up in social work that I think would appropriately transfer in a safe way. One is congruence, and we can break that into many different parts. One of the key foundational pieces of a lot of this relationship building stuff is having empathy.
I always use the vision of my grandmother, when thinking of a lot of this way of being. You can think to your childhood, and you have those examples of going into a tantrum or not being happy about something. I can just picture my grandma showing the empathy, but at the same time being like, “Yeah, that’s pretty sad. We’re still going to do it this way, though,” right?

Mike:
Right.

Will Moeller:
It’s that loving toughness at the same time, so empathy. Another one is choice. This is something I learned in school. I don’t know if my parents and grandparents were just so attuned with me that they just gave me what I wanted in a way that was right or was firm in the right way, but what we would teach a lot of parents, when working with their kids, is give them choice, right? If the kid wants to come to the dinner table and have soda for dinner, you can give them a choice of, “Okay, I’m sorry. I can’t let you have soda because it’s not a healthy choice for you. You can choose to have orange juice or milk.” A lot of kids will respond well to that. You can kind of translate that to the work we do, right? Like, “I can’t deliver the platform to you in this way, but I can give you option A or option B.”

Mike:
Right.

Will Moeller:
“Or I can give you option C, going into custom code, and all this other stuff,” and you can paint a price. They’ll suddenly start to lean back to, “Okay, A or B sounds pretty good right now.”

Mike:
Yeah, absolutely.

Will Moeller:
Empathy, congruence, giving people choice helps a lot, in addition to what was mentioned earlier, right? Speak their language. Speaking their language can come in different forms. If you work with a military audience, it’s making sure that you understand the jargon or the terms that they use. If you’re in a consulting firm, I hope that you’re thinking about these things when you work with your different clients. If it’s an educational institution, you should understand education jargon. If you’re going to work in a mental health treatment facility, you should understand mental health industry terms, across the board.
It comes in other forms, too. I did an enrichment session at my current employer recently and came up with a new acronym to help me remember something about how to be with somebody. It’s GET MTV. I don’t know. I think, Mike, you know what MTV is, and I think-

Mike:
Yeah. Well, I know what it used to be.

Will Moeller:
It sticks in my mind, because it just brings up memories, but what it stands for is gestures, empathy, movement, vocal tone, and then the other T is touch, which we’re just going to put that one. We don’t have enough time to talk through that one. We’ll put that one on a table and leave it aside, but gesture, empathy, movement, and vocal tone. If you can think about all of those when you’re meeting with your constituents or your user groups and speak their language, I mean, you can build rapport so fast with somebody.
Let me just pull one of those out that we haven’t touched on in another way, vocal tone. The way I learned and really got vocal tone emphasized for me was going to some training as a therapist, where the trainer worked with teenagers. Teenagers, a lot of times, have big, what they feel like are really big feelings. If you come in as a therapist, and you have a teenager come in the room, who is all worked up about something, and you do a neutral tone, “Tell me how that made you feel,” they might lose their mind in that moment, because they are huffing and puffing and are really animated.
What I saw this clinician do in the training was match them. He matched their intensity. He matched their movement. He matched their vocal tone. But, if you listened, the words he was using were words to help them calm down and to listen and to think about things. It was incredible to see them do that.
I know that most of… I hope most of our meetings at work don’t get to that level of animation. You can still match people’s intensity in the speed of their speech, the words that they’re choosing, the pitch in their tone, and I mean, actors think about this all the time. You’ve got to be selling the role or the feelings that you’re in as an actor. In a way, sometimes we have to kind of get into that mindset a little bit and matching the other person, so that they feel like you’re there with them. The reality is that you need to be congruent, because if you’re inauthentic, I hate to tell you, people will sniff it out fast, really fast.

Mike:
Yeah, I mean, just as you were explaining that, I was thinking of if you’ve ever been somewhere in a public space, and you’ve watched groups of people meet, or an individual go up to a group of people, one of two things happens. Either the person walking up mimics and acts and makes the same gestures as what’s accepted in the group or vice versa, right? They’ll either walk up, arms flailing or whatever, if the group is doing that, if that’s kind of the norm, or the reverse, so that they feel kind of assimilated.
I’ve thought of meetings that way, too, where people join, especially physical meetings. If somebody comes in and you’re kind of, you can’t put your finger on it, but the tone or the mood of the meeting changed, and it’s because they’re kind of coming in with a different vibe, which is a lot of movement and empathy and gestures and stuff, and that changes for the group, right?

Will Moeller:
Yes, yeah.

Mike:
Also, you don’t want to go in, arms flailing, to an executive meeting. “Hey, everybody!” You look like one of those inflatable dolls at the car dealership.

Will Moeller:
Yeah, and I’m pretty sure you’re going to lose a lot of credibility really fast, if that’s the way you start the meeting off.

Mike:
Most likely, most likely, I [inaudible 00:35:12].

Will Moeller:
That’s where it gets to matching, right?

Mike:
Yeah, yeah, absolutely.

Will Moeller:
Maybe another day we could get into group dynamics, because as you were talking about, the one person can bring the tone of the room down. Yes, I mean, there’s a… We could do a whole podcast on group dynamics. There’s whole semester courses on that.

Mike:
Oh, there… I mean, you could do a whole master’s degree on group dynamics. I remember studying that back in college, too, of understanding fandom and stuff like that.
As we kind of wrap up, we’ve touched on a lot of things, and GET MTV, and a lot of it is trust building. If there’s one thing, I always like to ask guests of… You know, the person gets done listening to this podcast. What’s the next thing that they should do after listening to this?

Will Moeller:
Yeah. That’s a hard question, because we’ve unpacked so much. Relationships are complicated, and they’re really dependent on where you are. The first thing I’ll say is, you can do it, because you’re already doing it, right? You already have relationships that you have built, and you’ve built trust in those.
I think the natural place for any one person to start is reflect on the ways that you are best at building those relationships, and start there. If you’re really good at empathy and listening, great. You’re a leg ahead of it.
If you’re really good at summarizing what somebody’s saying, start there. If you’re really good at seeing different paths, different options, start there. Start with what you’re good at.
I think where every listener needs to challenge themselves is how can I make sure that I am staying aligned with the other person? And the other person doesn’t have to be a singular person. This goes back to group dynamics. This other could be the business, the customer that you’re consulting with, the department that you’re building with, the user group that you’re with. How do you align yourselves with them?
It gets really challenging, because you have your goals and objectives, and they’re going to have their goals and objectives. You’ve got to find that sweet spot where everybody’s really in agreement and sees the value in the next steps. That’s hard, right?
You think of any relationship where they start to get out of kilter, a lot of times it’s where you’re not aligned. You’re not listening. You’re not on the same page. Like your cooking example, your cookies are going to come out terrible if you’re not aligned in how you’re going to do it and the timing of all that.
Start with where you’re good. Challenge yourself to get in better alignment. And just remember that you’re already doing it.

Mike:
I think that’s great advice. Thanks for coming on the pod, Will.

Will Moeller:
Thanks for having me, Mike.

Mike:
So, it was a great conversation with Will. I loved what he said there. I don’t know if you caught it. Start with what you’re good at, if you’re good at listening, good at empathizing, good at getting MTV. That was a great, great acronym that he shared with us. I think that’s a great place to start on your relationship building skills.
Now, if you enjoyed this episode, I need you to do me a favor and just share it with one person. If you’re listening on iTunes, all you’ve got to do is tap the three dots and click share episode. Then you can post it to social or you can text it to a friend. Of course, if you’re looking for more great resources, your one stop for everything Salesforce admin is admin.salesforce.com, including a transcript of this show. And be sure to join the conversation in the Admin Trailblazer Group in the Trailblazer Community. Don’t worry. The link is in the show notes. Until next week, we’ll see you in the Cloud.

 

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Create Content for Impactful Presentations with Ella Marks

Today on the Salesforce Admins Podcast, we talk to Ella Marks, Senior Marketing Manager at Salesforce. Join us as we chat about the keys to creating a great presentation, how to prep, and how to always nail your ending. You should subscribe for the full episode, but here are a few takeaways from our conversation […]

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Anna Szabo talks about never giving up on her dreams

Never Give Up on Your Dreams with Anna Szabo

Today on the Salesforce Admins Podcast, we talk to Anna Szabo, ISV Platform Expert at Salesforce. Join us as we chat about getting started with Trailhead, how to decide which certifications to go for, and why we all need to embrace failure. You should subscribe for the full episode, but here are a few takeaways […]

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Replay: Project Management with Emma Keeling

Today on the Salesforce Admins Podcast, we’re revisiting our episode with Emma Keeling, Salesforce Consultant and Nonprofit Community Group Leader. Join us as we chat about the skill of project management and some best practices to help you keep things organized. You should subscribe for the full episode, but here are a few takeaways from […]

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