How to Get Your First Salesforce Job with Tiffany Spencer

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This week on the Salesforce Admins Podcast, we’ve got Tiffany Spencer, COO of Esor Consulting Group and the founder of HBCUforce. We learn how she helps students gain the experience they need to land their first Salesforce job.

Join us as we talk about why process and solving is key to working in tech, how to gets hands-on experience with superbadges and case studies, and some great tips for networking effectively.

You should subscribe for the full episode, but here are a few takeaways from our conversation with Tiffany Spencer.

Producing an impossible report

Tiffany says she does everything, and she’s really not kidding. “I’m a consultant, a CRM manager, a business architect, a solution architect—it kind of depends on who you ask that day,” she says, “a big part of it is working with individuals that I train and helping them understand how to better utilize the Salesforce platform and how to continue on their journey.”

Tiffany started as an admin for a small land development company after only a week of training and quickly became all things Salesforce for her organization. “It was a really great position where I was able to play many roles,” she says, “I was the admin, I was the BA, the project manager, the architect, the trainer, and that sink-or-swim moment set the tone for all of my other positions.” She went on to several roles as both an admin and later a business analyst.

The craziest part about her whole journey is that that first job never mentioned Salesforce in the job description. Little did she know that her chance encounter with the platform would shape her entire career.

Bringing Salesforce to Students

Tiffany is the founder of HBCUforce, a nonprofit organization that partners with Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) to create programs that provide early access to cloud computing careers through exposure to Salesforce and their partners. She got the idea about two years ago when she visited her alma mater, Bethune-Cookman University, and decided to pop in a classroom. She started talking with some students about their career plans and explained to them what she does, and when she saw their interest she realized she could work with the school to create a program to show them exposure to everything a career in Salesforce can offer.

While many students aspire to land a position at Microsoft or Google, Tiffany’s found that they don’t often know that Salesforce is just as big (and innovative) of a company. Not only that, but 97% of Fortune 100 companies use the platform. In technology, it’s really about processes. Tiffany always tells students, “I’m not a coder, you don’t have to be a coder or a programmer or a developer to be in technology. There are all these other pieces of the puzzle that help developers do their job that you can be involved in.”

Getting Your First Salesforce Job

When you’re looking to get your first Salesforce job, Tiffany has a few tips that she’s seen work for her mentees. For one thing, you can do case studies and superbadges to get some hands-on experience. The other thing that really helps is getting familiar with Agile, whether that’s using a tool like Jira or Trello or even reading the Agile Manifesto.

Tiffany also tries to give her mentees opportunities to tackle real-life problems by bringing them into her pro-bono projects. If you don’t have a Tiffany in your life (yet), there are still ways to seek out something to get you started. “There are plenty of Tiffanys in the Salesforce ecosystem,” she says, “people are more than willing to guide and help so the first thing to do is to get involved with the community.” Start with your local community group, or organizations like PepUp Tech or Salesforce Military. “There’s not a shortage of people doing amazing things,” she says, “so you just got to get out there and start networking and connecting.”

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Full Show Transcript

Gillian Bruce:
Welcome to the Salesforce Admins Podcast where we talk about product, community, and careers to help make you an awesome admin. I’m Gillian Bruce.

Mike Gerholdt:
And I’m Mike Gerholdt.

Gillian Bruce:
And today we are talking to Tiffany Spencer, who does all of the things in Salesforce. She is the Chief Operating Officer of SR Consulting Group, and she is also the founder of HBCUforce. She’s based in Orlando, Florida, and I wanted to get her on the podcast to share something she’s very passionate about and some things that she has to help all of you who are maybe seeking your first admin job. So, without further ado, let’s welcome Tiffany to the podcast.

Gillian Bruce:
Tiffany, welcome to the podcast.

Tiffany Spencer:
Thank you so much for having me.

Gillian Bruce:
We’re thrilled that you can join us. And I wanted to give you an opportunity to introduce yourself a little bit to our listeners. Can you tell us what you do?

Tiffany Spencer:
I do everything. No. So, on several places it says Salesforce.com Superhero, but I am a consultant, a CRM manager, a business architect, a solution architect, it kind of depends on who you ask that day. And so, at this point, I have been able to kind of create just a mix of roles and day to day things that I do, and a big part of it is working with individuals that I train and helping them understand how to better utilize the Salesforce platform and how to continue on their journey.

Gillian Bruce:
Wow. So, you do all of the things. So, you know all of the Salesforce things, right?

Tiffany Spencer:
All the things, everything except for developers. Whatever they do, I don’t know that.

Gillian Bruce:
That’s okay. That’s why there’s lots of them we can work with, right?

Tiffany Spencer:
Yes.

Gillian Bruce:
So, now that you told us that you basically can do all of the things, can you give us a little brief overview of your journey and kind of how you got there?

Tiffany Spencer:
Sure. So, I started as an admin for a small land development company. The job title was actually business analyst and my very first week at the job, they sent me to the week long admin training and I became the Salesforce administrator. I was not familiar with Salesforce and I became all the things to that company. And so, it was a really great position where I was able to play many roles. So, I was the admin, I was the BA, I was the project manager, the architect, the trainer. And of course at the time, I didn’t know I was putting on all of those hats, but kind of my very first role for almost two years, I was everything Salesforce and that kind or sink or swim moment is how I started my career, and it kind of set the tone for, I think, all of my other positions.

Tiffany Spencer:
So, from there, I went on to do a few more admin roles, and then I went into some business analyst roles, actually had to work for a really large corporation, I worked for a global company. So locally here, there’s a company that… They’re in, I don’t know, four countries and I was able to work in their org and they used everything from territory management to advanced currency management. And I think that was my second or third position.

Tiffany Spencer:
And then I got to go be a BA at SunTrust now Truist. And of course, being a BA in a large corporation, in a Salesforce organization, that was a whole different hat, a new experience. And so, I’ve just been able to be a part of so many different organizations that do very different things, which makes me just this really weird mesh of a person, which naturally, is why I went into consulting.

Mike Gerholdt:
I wouldn’t call it weird mesh. I will ask, so the first position you mentioned intrigues me, you said it was land management?

Tiffany Spencer:
Yeah. They were a land development company.

Mike Gerholdt:
Okay. And it was a business analyst?

Tiffany Spencer:
Yeah.

Mike Gerholdt:
So did you know you were going to be working in Salesforce? I think a lot of the people in the community that Gillian and I talk with, “I’m applying for a Salesforce admin job. What should I look for?” Based on your description, that first job, but I wouldn’t know that Salesforce was included in it.

Tiffany Spencer:
It definitely wasn’t included in it. And in 2007 or six somewhere back then, it definitely wasn’t.

Mike Gerholdt:
Back when we used to count date and time.

Tiffany Spencer:
Yes. It definitely didn’t say Salesforce Business Analyst, it literally just said Business Analyst.

Mike Gerholdt:
Okay.

Tiffany Spencer:
I don’t even think that Salesforce came up in the interview or the job description, anything.

Gillian Bruce:
Wow. So, you got the job and then all of a sudden, “Hey, by the way, you’re going to also learn Salesforce.”

Tiffany Spencer:
Yes. So, it was like, “Surprise! You’re the person.” I was the admin. And on top of that, that company actually went through a reorg. So, they were moving from Atlanta to Orlando, where I am, and some of the executives that made the initial decisions about Salesforce were not moving with the company. And so, I got to do not only the go live in training, but then I got to do a re-implementation when all the new executives said, “But I think Salesforce should do this.”

Gillian Bruce:
Well, there you go, learning quickly, right?

Tiffany Spencer:
Yes.

Gillian Bruce:
I mean, just get getting it all under your belt super fast.

Tiffany Spencer:
Yes. And my customer success manager, I think that’s what they were called at the time, whoever that was was amazing. I don’t know who you are, but if you worked with a company and someone eight years ago in Orlando, it was me and you were amazing.

Mike Gerholdt:
I feel like we could totally have like a retro Oprah Winfrey moment where we, “We have that customer success major on the line with us right now!”

Tiffany Spencer:
That would be so awesome! [crosstalk 00:06:52]-

Mike Gerholdt:
“Joining us from Tampa Bay.” We don’t, sorry. We had known that earlier. We were better podcast.

Tiffany Spencer:
Oh, darn.

Mike Gerholdt:
Yeah, would have been awesome.

Tiffany Spencer:
Yes. I owe that person everything. Literally, they were like my lifeline. I’m like, “They’re asking me how to do this look up field or whatever.” And totally just was on the phone with my CSN like every week.

Mike Gerholdt:
So when you got started with that land management company, and I don’t mean to be stuck there, but it sounds like business analyst was a huge part of what you did prior to being at that company or was something you were definitely predisposed to. Do you find that working with Salesforce, that’s a large part of your job?

Tiffany Spencer:
I think so. I think once you get past being excited about just knowing how to create the field and add the field to the page layout, then you take the next step of, “Why am I adding this field? Are you sure we need it?” And I think that’s how you naturally move down kind of the BA kind of path there or add that skill set to the admin skillset.

Gillian Bruce:
So, one of the things, Tiffany, that you also do in addition to all of your Salesforce hats is, you are very active in the community and you have created something pretty awesome that I’d love to learn a little bit more about, and it’s called HBCUforce. Can you tell us a little bit about what that is and what you’re doing with all that?

Tiffany Spencer:
Yes. If you could see me, I’m a smiling ear to ear, but-

Gillian Bruce:
We can hear your smile.

Tiffany Spencer:
Yeah. HBCUforce is a nonprofit organization that partners with Historically Black Colleges and Universities, HBCUs, to implement programs that provide early access to cloud computing careers through exposure to Salesforce and their partners.

Gillian Bruce:
Okay. So, that sounds amazing. You have a huge passion for this, I am hearing your smile through the headphones I have on. Tell me a little bit about kind of your motivation behind doing that, what some of the activities are that are happening in that space. Because I’m very intrigued and I want to know more and I even know what our listeners probably do too.

Mike Gerholdt:
Yeah. So, I started about two years ago, I’m very active at my alma mater and I was visiting a classroom, I like to pop in and, because it’s a smaller school, I keep in touch with the professors there. And I was talking with some students, some computer science and computer information system students, and just asking them about their career plans. They were probably sophomores, juniors, and they had all these, I don’t want to say random, but just various career paths. And I asked them about being a consultant or be in a business analyst. I explained to them what I do and they were just were not as familiar with Salesforce as I would have hoped, nor were they kind of familiar with like what a BA is or what a consultant is.

Mike Gerholdt:
And so, I started talking to them about Salesforce and about what I do and the opportunities there. And they were really interested and I wanted to continue to share just all the amazing opportunities that a career in the Salesforce ecosystem could give them. And so, I started working with Bethune-Cookman University for a few months, and then I took that model and decided to take that same information to other HBCUs.

Gillian Bruce:
So I think one of the things that was interesting that you said is that you were shocked that students didn’t really know about Salesforce. I run into that. I think a lot of us who are so in deep with the Salesforce bubble probably have that happen to us a lot where we were like, “Oh yeah, Salesforce, blah, blah, blah.” And then someone’s like, “Wait, what? You mean salespeople? I don’t understand.” So, can you-

Tiffany Spencer:
Definitely.

Gillian Bruce:
Yeah. I mean, it’s crazy, right? But I bet that moment of realizing like, “Okay, so these people don’t even know about these opportunities in this whole industry.” Can you talk to us a little bit about kind of how you usually approach that? Because I think everyone listening is probably already in the Salesforce bubble, so help us get some tips on how to let people know, who don’t know, about Salesforce and the ecosystem and opportunities there.

Tiffany Spencer:
So one of the first things I usually say to just kind of get their attention is that Salesforce is as big of a company as Microsoft and Google. When I try to explain just the sheer size and the impact of Salesforce, I mean, I want them to know that, hey, students look at Google and Microsoft as the places to be, and I want them to understand that Salesforce is right there, you definitely want to be there.

Tiffany Spencer:
So I start with that. And then I always like to tell the cool story about the app store, that Salesforce had the first app store. We actually gave the app store to Apple.

Gillian Bruce:
Yeah, that’s fun Salesforce trivia that very few people know.

Tiffany Spencer:
And so, since I was like, “Oh wow, really?” Really, it’s true. And then I like to tell students, and anyone I meet, that 97% of the fortune 100, those companies use Salesforce, that it’s used across all of the top companies in the world, especially here in Orlando. Disney’s everything, so I tell them, “The mouse uses Salesforce.” So, that makes it special.

Mike Gerholdt:
When you’re talking with students, obviously we can all think back to when we were in college and just trying to be exposed to different things, do you find some students have a certain predisposition to be more interested in tech that would lead them into working with technology or understanding that? I remember way, way back thinking, as you looked at different careers, some careers were better if you were able to think in 3D, as they called it. If you’re putting Lego blocks together versus being able to think in math, like writing code.

Tiffany Spencer:
Yeah. I’ve run across different students. So definitely students that are interested in math, but students that are interested in processes, students that like to think a little bit deeper around how things work or want to put the pieces of something together, I think, tend to be more steered toward technology. And then, I always tell people, sometimes they think about technology as coding and they can’t wrap their mind around coding. And I always try to encourage students that, “I’m not a coder, you don’t have to be a coder or programmer or developer to be in technology.” That there are all these other pieces of the puzzle that make developers… That help them do their jobs. And so, there’s pieces before and after the fact that you can still be involved in.

Tiffany Spencer:
And just a general liking of technology. So I just like technology. When I was younger, I participated in many summer camps where you took apart the computer and took apart the computer board and put it back together. I don’t know if that sounds nerdy, but it was fun to me.

Gillian Bruce:
Not nerdy on this podcast.

Mike Gerholdt:
Yeah.

Gillian Bruce:
[crosstalk 00:15:05].

Tiffany Spencer:
So yeah, I think those students that have that curiosity of how things work with businesses and business processes, and I think they kind of have a general leaning toward technology type careers.

Mike Gerholdt:
I mean, it kind of also speaks to how fast technology moves. If you look in the last few decades, it went from… You see the first Apple computer and that was technology, and that was exactly what you explained, to now technology is using WiziWig and online builders, like Flow, to automate things. Yeah.

Gillian Bruce:
So, Tiffany, I’d love to hear a little bit about kind of HBCUforce, some of the students you meet are actually kind of getting exposed to Salesforce and going through training, do you have any stories that you want to share maybe about some of the early successes that might be happening with this organization?

Tiffany Spencer:
Yeah. So, one of my very first students that… In the beginning, I had a group of like five students that I bribed them with pizza and said, “If you just come sit at my dining room table then we could do Trailhead.” And they did it.

Gillian Bruce:
Hey, college kids are starving, right?

Mike Gerholdt:
Yeah.

Tiffany Spencer:
And so, those guys and my husband, we would sit at my dining room table because it was summer and school was out, so I couldn’t do it at the school. But one of those students, Ryan Williams, who is now a senior, he started when he was a sophomore. We took a field trip to Coastal Cloud, which is about 30 minutes from the school. And Coastal Cloud did an amazing half a day for them, where the CEO, Tim, like, “Tell them about what a consultant does, and let me tell you about Coastal Cloud.” And they did this really cool demo with some Ferrari dealership or something where they were showing them how this works. I don’t know what it was, but it was really cool and then offered my students a chance to intern there.

Tiffany Spencer:
So Ryan is interning with Coastal Cloud for probably two summers now, and during his school year, he just passed his admin certification a few months ago. And so, he’ll graduate from college as a certified admin with two years of hands on consulting experience.

Gillian Bruce:
That’s so awesome! Congratulations!

Tiffany Spencer:
So, just think about how valuable he is to a partner now, or any customer. But specifically, if you think about the partner ecosystem, how they would love to hire new grads, but then they’re like, “But they’ve never worked at a consulting company. They’ve never worked with a client. They don’t know how an enterprise project works.” But Ryan does.

Gillian Bruce:
Yeah. That’s amazing. And I think a lot of people who are passionate about being in the Salesforce community try to kind of bridge and solve that gap like you just described. And so I think, that’s incredible that you’ve had that success and I know it’s so early and it’s just one story there’s going to be so many more. One of the things you mentioned is, when people apply for those first jobs, they say, “Oh, you don’t have experience with this. And you don’t have hands on experience.” Talk to us a little bit about that in terms of… You said Trailhead was one of the things you were doing with the students, but it’s more than that. So you talked about how they got the internship, but what are some things that help you prepare to get that first Salesforce first job that aren’t just Trailhead or before you get that internship?

Tiffany Spencer:
Yeah. So I think, there’s a lot of different areas and things that I try to touch along with students or anyone in the community that I train. So, one is definitely getting a lot… Doing the super badges and case studies to get some hands on experience. I like to bring in the individuals that I’m training and some of my nonprofit pro-bono projects, or even paid clients as a resource so that they get some good hands on experience that they can include on their resume so that they have the experience of working on a project or working as an admin and kind of getting those questions and learning how to go to Google and go to all of the Salesforce resources to look up an answer and go down the help document rabbit hole that we love. That’s really important to know how to do.

Tiffany Spencer:
The second thing is, I have students who use JIRA or Trello so that they get familiar with Agile and even reading the Agile manifesto or reading some books on Agile and Scrum, I think, is really helpful because everybody’s doing some version of that somewhere.

Gillian Bruce:
Yeah. I mean, those are two things I think are really important, and one of the things that I loved you point out is the importance of Agile. I mean, we use it at Salesforce, I think every tech company anyone’s encountered, as you said, uses some version of it. I mean, that’s a whole different kind of skillset to learn. I remember, gosh, I think I took a project management course in college that we spent the entire semester learning about Waterfall and I remember talking to a friend who was at a-

Mike Gerholdt:
It’s a semester you’re never going to get back, Gillian.

Gillian Bruce:
Total waste of time! And I remember talking to a friend who was working at it at a venture capital company that was in the tech space, and I was describing what I was doing. And I was like, “This is great. I’m going to get the certification.” They’re like, “Yeah, don’t do that.”

Mike Gerholdt:
You know what? You got to listen to TLC and just don’t go chasing waterfalls.

Tiffany Spencer:
That’s what I was thinking in my head-

Mike Gerholdt:
Yeah, you were.

Tiffany Spencer:
… when you said Waterfall.

Mike Gerholdt:
Everyone else was.

Gillian Bruce:
Please stick to the rivers and the lakes that you’re used to.

Tiffany Spencer:
Yes.

Gillian Bruce:
Well, that took a turn. Now I’m going to have TLC in my head all day. [crosstalk 00:21:28]-

Mike Gerholdt:
[crosstalk 00:21:29].

Tiffany Spencer:
Mike, are you doing a dance with your shoulders and [crosstalk 00:21:32]-

Mike Gerholdt:
Oh yeah. Yeah, there’s a reason that this is an audio podcast. Let me tell you.

Gillian Bruce:
Oh my goodness. That’s awesome. Well, the other thing, Tiffany, that you mentioned that I think is something I’d love to maybe dive in a little bit more is the idea of you’ve been able to give opportunities to these students to actually work on real life problems. So, if you maybe don’t have a Tiffany in your life, how would you kind of seek out some of those opportunities?

Tiffany Spencer:
Yeah. So, there’s plenty of Tiffany’s in the Salesforce ecosystem. People are more than willing to kind of guide and help. And so, I think one of the first things you have to do is get involved with the community. So, get involved with your local community group, join one of the many different just groups out there. Like Pep Up Tech has a ton of different trainings that they offer, and if you’re a veteran then Salesforce Military has a lot of programs. I mean, there’s just so many groups to get involved. I always tell people, between the community groups, the chatter groups or the community groups, and Twitter and LinkedIn. I mean, you can definitely find someone somewhere. There’s just not a shortage of people doing amazing things. So you just got to get out there and start networking and connecting for sure.

Mike Gerholdt:
So, Tiffany, let me ask you to kind of go one level deeper on that. Because I hear that a lot and I know Gillian’s heard that a lot and, truth be told, when we speak at universities or do training sessions with cohorts, we tell people to get involved. What is one thing that they can do to get involved? Because I think they hear that a lot, “No, I’ve got to get involved.” And then they either go to the Trailblazer community or they go to Twitter and they’re like, “I don’t know what to do.”

Tiffany Spencer:
So, I think you have to identify someone that you connect with or you think you might connect with, or maybe identify five of them, but find someone and in reach out to them instead of a meeting, whoever answers first. I get inbox messages all the time and I take the time to respond to people. So I think one, I think you should reach out to someone to set up a meeting, especially the Trailhead mentor program. But then I think us, in the ecosystem, if we can take out the time to then respond and kind of guide those people. Otherwise, you’re right. I mean, I don’t know how you would start without having someone to kind of answer questions and a lot of what I do, I try to record, or I try to put it into a blog post to be able to answer a lot of the questions I get all the time, but I always make myself available for like a 15 minute meeting as well.

Mike Gerholdt:
That’s good advice. Thank you.

Gillian Bruce:
That’s really good advice. And I think, for those maybe who aren’t looking for that first job, but as you mentioned, if you’re already in the community, take that five minutes to respond to that message. It can mean a lot to somebody. And I think, Tiffany, you are the epitome of how generous the community can be, and I think maybe folks who are in the community, but not sure how to contribute, it’s as simple as that, being available.

Mike Gerholdt:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Tiffany Spencer:
Yeah, it really is everything to someone because I think we take for granted how… We’re just used to the ecosystem. We’re used to logging into Trailhead and knowing what all the links mean and all the community groups are. But if you just imagine someone new and they’re logging into the community groups for the first time and seeing 100 chatter groups they can join, then finding their first community group, and, “What does this even mean?” I mean, it’s overwhelming, honestly.

Gillian Bruce:
It’s a nice problem to have, but it is a problem to have, right?

Mike Gerholdt:
Yeah.

Tiffany Spencer:
So just don’t take that for granted, somebody may just need a little bit of direction.

Mike Gerholdt:
Yeah. Tiffany, as we kind of wrap things up and there’s admins out there looking for their first job, maybe it’s with a land management company, what are some of the tips that you would give people for getting their first admin job?

Tiffany Spencer:
So I tell people that don’t look for job titled Salesforce admin. There are a lot of companies even here in Orlando that use Salesforce but don’t have an entry level position called Salesforce admin. Sometimes it’s just called something else. And so, instead, it’s better to just do a keyword search for Salesforce. I don’t even do salesforce.com. I do a key word search for Salesforce and sometimes even for just CRM and sometimes SFDC, because again, depending on the company and how new they are to Salesforce, job descriptions can be interesting.

Tiffany Spencer:
And so, I think you’ll find a lot more results that come back with more entry level positions where maybe you’re utilizing Salesforce, maybe you’re helping someone in the company runs Salesforce [inaudible 00:27:08] to be more like a power user, and I think that’s a good first job until you find an admin job, because sometimes there just isn’t one. The second thing is, have a lot of alerts setup’s, so LinkedIn alerts, Indeed alerts, and as soon as you see a job, you should really try to apply within the first day or two. So, those are my very first admin job tips.

Mike Gerholdt:
Those are great.

Gillian Bruce:
Those are great. And I love your point about, don’t worry about the title. We have seen a zillion different titles for essentially Salesforce admin jobs. So that’s a really good tip.

Tiffany Spencer:
Yeah. I’ve seen everything but junior Salesforce admin, everything.

Gillian Bruce:
Yeah. I don’t think I’ve actually seen anyone officially have a top job title of junior Salesforce admin.

Tiffany Spencer:
Yep, it’s not called that, I promise.

Gillian Bruce:
That’s great. Well, Tiffany, thank you so much for taking the time to chat with us and share your passion about HBCUforce and what you’re doing to help students get exposed and included in the amazing Salesforce job space, and for sharing some really valuable tips as well. So, I really appreciate you. Thank you.

Tiffany Spencer:
Thank you.

Mike Gerholdt:
So it was great to meet with Tiffany and to hear all of the things that she’s doing around HBCUforce, and her passion and excitement totally comes through with everything that we discussed about. So three things I learned in our quick discussion with Tiffany. The first, process and solving, or kind of understanding how things work, was really key to what she sees in a lot of the students she works with and in herself for working with Salesforce. And I have to agree. I mean, I think it’s why we probably use Lego bricks in a lot of the analogies that we talk about.

Mike Gerholdt:
The next thing, and this is so relevant to a lot of the conversations I’ve been having, is doing super badges and reading case studies to get even more hands on experience. And then of course, when it comes to connecting, you’re probably going to hear this a lot, like, “Oh, connect to people in the ecosystem or reach out to people on social.” I love her suggestion of find and follow at least five people that you feel you could connect with. And it could be connecting with them, “Hey, they do Salesforce. And they also like this other thing that I like.” Maybe it’s cooking Food Network stuff or whatever. I don’t know, but I love her suggestion with finding five people. It’s a very tactical thing you can do.

Mike Gerholdt:
And then the last thing that I learned, in terms of looking for a Salesforce admin job, or looking at your Salesforce admin career, you don’t have to look for the job title per se. Excellent, excellent suggestion is instead, do a keyword search on Salesforce or CRM. She has a few other suggestions, but look at all the things that, that position entails and that’s really how you can kind of grow your responsibility and grow more of what you’re in charge of. And you can be, I believe Tiffany referred to herself as a Salesforce superhero, so I kind of like that term, we’ll run with that.

Mike Gerholdt:
And of course, if you want to learn about more things Salesforce and Salesforce admin go to admin.salesforce.com to find more resources. And just a reminder, if you love what you’re hearing, please pop on over to iTunes, give us a review, it helps admins find our podcast, it brings the podcast closer to the top of the iTunes listing so that more admins, like the ones that Tiffany works with, can listen to our podcast, get great tips and we can help more people succeed.

Mike Gerholdt:
You can stay up to date with us on social for all things admins. We are @Salesforceadmns, No, I. Our guest today was Tiffany Spencer, and you can find her on Twitter. There’s a pretty cool name @thetiffspencer. I am Mike Gerholdt on Twitter, you can find me @mikegerholdt, I tried to keep it simple. And our host today, Gillian is @gilliankbruce. So with that, stay safe, stay awesome, and stay tuned for the next episode, because we’ll see you In the cloud.

 

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Today on the Salesforce Admins Podcast, we’re live from Dreamforce with Laura Walker, Salesforce Admin Consultant and Solution Architect. We caught up with her just as she stepped off the Salesforce Admin keynote stage.  Join us as we talk about how far Salesforce has come, how to be your own PR, and the trick to […]

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